Klaus Hart Brasilientexte

Aktuelle Berichte aus Brasilien – Politik, Kultur und Naturschutz

Liberias Friedensnobelpreisträgerin von 2011, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, kritisiert homosexuellen Geschlechtsverkehr. Tony Blair will sich nicht äußern…”O que è isso, presidenta?”(O Estado de Sao Paulo)

Zitate aus The Guardian:

Nobel peace prize winner defends law criminalising homosexuality in Liberia

Liberia’s president and Tony Blair discuss anti-gay law. Link to this video

The Nobel peace prize winner and president of Liberia, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, has defended a law that criminalises homosexual acts, saying: “We like ourselves just the way we are.”

In a joint interview with Tony Blair, who was left looking visibly uncomfortable by her remarks, Sirleaf told the Guardian: “We’ve got certain traditional values in our society that we would like to preserve.”

Liberian legislation classes “voluntary sodomy” as a misdemeanour punishable by up to one year in prison, but two new bills have been proposed that would target homosexuality with much tougher sentences.

There have been no recent convictions under the sodomy law, according to the latest US state department human rights report. However, anti-gay activists have promoted two new bills which would take the legislation much further. One would amend the penal code to make a person guilty of a second-degree felony if he or she “seduces, encourages or promotes another person of the same gender to engage in sexual activities” or “purposefully engages in acts that arouse or tend to arouse another person of the same gender to have sexual intercourse”, carrying a prison sentence of up to five years.

The second bill – drafted by the ex-wife of the former president Charles Taylor – would make gay marriage a crime punishable by up to 10 years in jail. Jewel Howard Taylor told the Guardian: “[Homosexuality] is a criminal offence. It is un-African.” She went on to say: “It is a problem in our society. We consider deviant sexual behaviour criminal behaviour.

“We are just trying to strengthen our local laws. This is not an attempt to bash homosexuals.”

The gay rights debate erupted in Liberia after the US secretary of state, Hillary Clinton, announced in December that America’s foreign aid budget would promote the protection of gay rights, prompting speculation that funds would be tied to rights records.

The announcement brought unprecedented attention to homosexuality in a country where until recently gay people and lesbians lived in secret, but generally not in fear for their lives. Since Clinton’s remarks, Liberian newspapers have published numerous articles and editorials describing homosexuality as “desecrating”, “abusive” and an “abomination”.

“Over the last six months, we’ve seen a worrying increase in anti-gay rhetoric, intolerance and indeed attacks on individuals fighting for the rights of Liberians in same-sex relationships,” said Corinne Dufka, a senior researcher for Human Rights Watch in west Africa.

In the past month alone there have been at least six homophobic attacks in the capital, Monrovia.

One 21-year-old gay man, who recently left Monrovia to move to the countryside after some of his friends were threatened, said he now lived in fear of mob violence, a common occurrence on the streets of Monrovia. “You and your brother walking down the street, they may actually jump on you and beat you, kill you, and when they say: ‘Oh they are gay, that’s the reason we killed them,’ nothing will come of it,” he said.

Homosexuality is already illegal in 37 African countries. In Uganda, a bill proposing custodial sentences for homosexuality is still being considered, although it no longer contains the provision for the death penalty. Ten women were recently arrested in Cameroon accused of being lesbians, while in Nigeria, homosexual activities are punishable by up to 14 years in prison.

Sirleaf was awarded the Nobel peace prize last year for her work in campaigning for women’s rights. The 73-year-old became Africa’s first female president in 2006 and was elected for a second term last year. “If she tried to decriminalise the [current anti-gay] law it would be political suicide,” said Tiawan S Gongloe, the country’s former solicitor general. Without a majority government, Sirleaf desperately needs the support of other MPs to tackle other issues such as corruption, exploitation of the country’s natural resources and mass youth unemployment, he said.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/mar/19/nobel-peace-prize-law-homosexuality?intcmp=239

http://www.hart-brasilientexte.de/2010/02/09/bisexuelles-brasilien-und-aids-warn-video-anklicken/

Dieser Beitrag wurde am Donnerstag, 22. März 2012 um 00:23 Uhr veröffentlicht und wurde unter der Kategorie Kultur, Politik abgelegt. Du kannst die Kommentare zu diesen Eintrag durch den RSS-Feed verfolgen.

«  –  »

Keine Kommentare

Noch keine Kommentare

Die Kommentarfunktion ist zur Zeit leider deaktiviert.

    NEU: Fotoserie Gesichter Brasiliens

    Fotostrecken Wasserfälle Iguacu und Karneval 2008

    23' K23

interessante Links

Seiten

Ressorts

Suchen


RSS-Feeds

Verwaltung

 

© Klaus Hart – Powered by WordPress – Design: Vlad (aka Perun)